Saturday, March 23, 2019

Maine gets an “F” for efforts to address lead in school drinking water

Reacting to pervasive lead contamination in schools’ drinking water, Environment Maine Research & Policy Center gave Maine an F grade today for addressing the problem, according to a new national report. In the second edition of Environment Maine Research & Policy Center’s Get The Lead Out study, the state showed poor progress as Maine received an “F” grade in 2017, as well. We are calling for swift action to ensure lead-free water in Maine’s schools.

“Schools should be safe places for our kids to learn and play, but Maine is still failing to protect our kids from lead in drinking water,” said Carissa Maurin, State Director with Environment Maine Research & Policy Center. “We need policies that actually get the lead out of faucets and fountains in our schools and pre-schools.”

More >> Maine gets an “F” for efforts to address lead in school drinking water

Monday, March 18, 2019

Maine woman arrested in Beverly, charged with kidnapping 2 children

A 28-year-old woman wanted for kidnapping her two children from Maine was arrested in a home here after a "Be On the Lookout" alert was issued.

Brittany Bohan, 28, was apprehended Monday by Massachusetts State Police. She was charged with being a fugitive from justice and on a court warrant and will be arraigned Tuesday in Salem District Court, police said.

More >> Maine woman arrested in Beverly, charged with kidnapping 2 children

Friday, March 15, 2019

Mother of Ayla Reynolds asks court for more time to find girl’s father



The mother of missing Maine toddler Ayla Reynolds is asking for more time to find the little girl’s father.

An attorney for Trista Reynolds told CBS 13 a request was filed in court for an additional 60 days to find Justin DiPietro.

More >> Mother of Ayla Reynolds asks court for more time to find girl’s father

Saturday, March 9, 2019

DHHS Commissioner Outlines Plan To Improve Child Protective Services

State officials told members of the legislature's Government Oversight Committee Friday that improvements to the child protective system are underway. The panel held a public hearing on the latest report following the abuse deaths of two girls last winter, which details a number of concerns raised by caseworkers. Some lawmakers and citizens say they want more to be done, and soon.

According to the report, the top concerns reported include large caseloads and a shortage of foster placements, which means caseworkers often spend hours or days with children in hotels and emergency rooms. Child protective workers are also frustrated that changes in protective services were made without their input in the wake of the deaths of two girls.

More >> DHHS Commissioner Outlines Plan To Improve Child Protective Services

FYI: They are all clueless.  What they need to do is to provide the services that help to keep kids safe in the home so they don't have the foster care system flooded with frivolous cases. 


Friday, March 1, 2019

Political advocacy in classroom ban, cursive bill, both fail

Two bills have failed in committee that would have made changes to Maine schools. One would have banned teachers from engaged in political or ideological advocacy in the classroom. The other would have required students in elementary school learn cursive.

More >> Political advocacy in classroom ban, cursive bill, both fail

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Flaws in Maine’s child protection system frustrate frontline workers, report says

The Legislature’s watchdog agency reported Friday that Maine’s child protective system is hobbled by overburdened caseworkers, staffing shortages, inefficient computer systems and a lack of foster families that forces caseworkers to supervise abused or at-risk children in hotels and hospitals for long periods.

 The findings, based on a survey and interviews with staff in the Office of Child and Family Services, are part of a new report to the Legislature’s Government Oversight Committee that follows the deaths of two children in 2017 and 2018.

More >> Flaws in Maine’s child protection system frustrate frontline workers, report says

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Lawmakers, educators introduce bill to stop "food shaming" in public schools

Lawmakers are once again introducing a bill to stop so-called "food shaming" in schools, saying students who can't pay for their meals are being singled out.

"I know they can't learn without it. I know they struggle," said Dea Swain, who works as an ed tech in Aroostook County.

More >> Lawmakers, educators introduce bill to stop "food shaming" in public schools