Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Maine school board’s refusal to discuss bullying angers parents



The Sheepscot Valley Regional School Unit Board of Directors did not allow comments about bullying and other issues at Whitefield Elementary School during its Jan. 11 meeting, despite the presence of parents, teachers, and community members hoping to revisit the issues.

There was standing room only for the meeting at Chelsea Elementary School. The meeting was the board’s first since a contentious Dec. 14 meeting during which, for two hours or so, people shared stories of assault and bullying at Whitefield Elementary.


More >> Maine school board’s refusal to discuss bullying angers parents

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Ethical dilemma: Recording students

The parents of Ben Pollack, a nonverbal teenager, want him to carry an audio recorder during the school day to ensure that he is not mistreated. On Monday, a federal appeals court in Boston heard arguments in the case, which was brought after his southern Maine school district, citing the privacy rights of other students, declined permission to record. Roll tape? Here are two views:

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Friday, January 12, 2018

Number of drug-affected babies born in Maine declines for the first time in over a decade

The decrease to 952 cases in 2017 came after a long period of increases coinciding with rising opioid use, but treatment experts say the epidemic still has the state firmly in its grip.

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Sunday, January 7, 2018

Parents fight to record school day of son with disabilities

A Maine teen with autism and a rare neurological syndrome that affects his speaking ability cannot talk to his parents about his school day the same way other students can. So his family is fighting for the right for him to carry an audio-recording device to ensure he's being treated properly when they aren't watching.

More >> Parents fight to record school day of son with disabilities

Thursday, January 4, 2018

LePage sends welfare cash to after-school programs to curb ‘out-of-wedlock pregnancies’

This school year, Gov. Paul LePage’s administration is spending $1.7 million on after-school programs that once would have gone to low-income families with children in the form of cash assistance.

More >> LePage sends welfare cash to after-school programs to curb ‘out-of-wedlock pregnancies’

Thursday, December 21, 2017

State plans new psychiatric facilities to take pressure off youth prison, official says

PORTLAND, Maine — The state intends to set up secure, regional psychiatric facilities to serve young people with serious mental illness and relieve pressure on Maine’s youth prison, Department of Corrections officials said Thursday.

For more than a year, the Long Creek Youth Development Center has been strained by the influx of teenagers whose needs prison officials have acknowledged cannot be met in a corrections facility.

More >> State plans new psychiatric facilities to take pressure off youth prison, official says

Corrections officials say Long Creek is making progress, fixing problems

SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine (NEWS CENTER)-- The leader of Maine’s corrections system says they’re making significant changes at the Long Creek Youth Development Center,  following recommendations from an independent audit earlier this year. That audit led the Maine Civil Liberties Union to say Long Creek should be closed.


More >> Corrections officials say Long Creek is making progress, fixing problems