Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Parents concerned with Gov. LePage's plan for special needs students

It could be a major change for preschool children with special needs, as Governor LePage looks to shift responsibility from the state to local school districts.

Right now, the state pays about $40 million a year to provide services for about 2,500 special needs preschoolers.

More >> Parents concerned with Gov. LePage's plan for special needs students

Saturday, September 16, 2017

LePage wants schools to take over special ed services for preschool kids

Governor LePage apparently doesn't understand that the Special Education system in Maine, when left to the schools, is a joke that couldn't possibly perform the task that he is suggesting.
The LePage administration wants local school districts to start providing special education services for about 2,500 3- to 5-year-olds with disabilities and developmental delays who currently receive the support through a $39 million state program. 
Under a bill the Maine Department of Education plans for next year’s legislative session, the state’s Child Development Services program would eventually stop providing services such as speech and occupational therapy, psychological services and others to young children with disabilities, autism or other needs that, left unaddressed, could grow into more significant problems once they reach school. 
More >> LePage wants schools to take over special ed services for preschool kids

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Parents’ concussion fears keep more Maine kids off football fields

Ah yes.  Modern parenting.

Feminizing the boys.

Turning them into wimps by forcing them to avoid every possible risk.  

The same type of parent who would expect a trophy for participation even when your kid sucks.
Crystal Sands appreciates the enthusiasm surrounding “Friday Night Lights” more than most of her peers. 
More >> Parents’ concussion fears keep more Maine kids off football fields
It's called fate and fate will find a way.  It happens.  Kids fall off their bikes and skateboards.  Kids get injured while playing sports.  If you avoid that then fate will find another way.  Perhaps a car accident or a tornado or something.

The best thing you can do for your kid is toughen them up.

Maine parents still in the dark about criminal checks on school employees

Delayed setup of a state online database means the public can't see background and credentials information for school district employees before October.

More >> Maine parents still in the dark about criminal checks on school employees

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Lewiston Middle School: Students will see strict cellphone ban

LEWISTON — Lewiston Middle School students this year will be barred from using cellphones during school hours to curb negative social-media postings.


More >> Lewiston Middle School: Students will see strict cellphone ban

Monday, August 21, 2017

Cheverus High School cancels all activities today following threat

An employee received an email about a threat to the school over the weekend, according to a school official.

More >> Cheverus High School cancels all activities today following threat

15 Years Later, Maine’s ‘One Laptop Per Child’ Initiative Hasn’t Helped Test Scores


When the Internet and digital tools first rose into popular consciousness, one major concern was that the barriers to access them would create a “digital divide” between rich and poor. Those with access to expensive new technology, the thinking went, would rocket ahead of those without it.

More >> 15 Years Later, Maine’s ‘One Laptop Per Child’ Initiative Hasn’t Helped Test Scores

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Ex-Westbrook High track coach who admitted having sex with student found dead

The body of Timothy Even, 28, of Stoneham was found Friday in his car in Lovell, an apparent suicide, Maine State Police say.

More >> Ex-Westbrook High track coach who admitted having sex with student found dead

Gov. LePage calls teachers 'a dime a dozen'


PITTSFIELD, Maine (AP) — Maine Gov. Paul LePage has criticized traditional education during the unveiling of a new vocational school, describing classroom teachers as "a dime a dozen."

More >> Gov. LePage calls teachers 'a dime a dozen'

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Portland, ME school district: White teachers need not apply

Ninety-seven percent of teachers in Portland Public Schools are white, and forty percent of students are not.

And that’s a problem for Superintendent Xavier Botana, the Bangor Daily News reports.

More >> Portland, ME school district: White teachers need not apply

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Parents Reach Settlement With District Over Head-Bagging

READFIELD, Maine - The parents of a Maine elementary school student who filed a lawsuit claiming a teacher put a bag on the student's head several times have reached a proposed settlement.

More >> Parents Reach Settlement With District Over Head-Bagging

Monday, August 14, 2017

Educators, Advocates Fear New Standards Could Keep Students With Disabilities From Graduating

Educators and advocates are speaking out about proposed changes to Maine’s law on proficiency-based diplomas. At a public hearing on Monday, they said new rules proposed by the state Department of Education may violate federal law and could keep many students with disabilities from graduating.

More >> Educators, Advocates Fear New Standards Could Keep Students With Disabilities From Graduating

Friday, August 11, 2017

Long Creek youth correctional facility to get new superintendent

The Maine Department of Corrections has hired a new superintendent for Long Creek Youth Development Center.

Corrections Commissioner Dr. Joseph Fitzpatrick confirmed that the agency has hired Caroline Raymond, CEO of Day One, a nonprofit substance abuse and behavioral health treatment organization for adolescents based in South Portland, to be the next leader of the state’s only youth correctional facility.

More >> Long Creek youth correctional facility to get new superintendent

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Mental health centers are calling the cops on their own juvenile patients

A new study by Disability Rights Maine has found that organizations paid by taxpayers to help juveniles with mental health crises frequently call the cops on the young people in their care, sometimes passing responsibility for mentally ill teenagers over to the state’s law enforcement and corrections officials.


More >> Mental health centers are calling the cops on their own juvenile patients

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Maine turns blind eye to child abuse

Guess what isn't safe in Maine ladies...
Maine's legislature failed to protect little girls from a horrible mutilation practice, so the bill's sponsor now is focusing on the governor's office in hopes of reviving it. 
State Representative Heather Sirocki tried to get a bill passed to criminalize female genital mutilation practiced by part of the state's population. Although it was tossed between both houses, the bill failed to pass by the end of the session. 
More >> Maine turns blind eye to child abuse

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

As session ends, Legislature overrides LePage veto, raising legal age for tobacco to 21

AUGUSTA — Mainers will still be able to talk on their cellphones while driving but won’t be able buy cigarettes until they turn 21 after the Legislature on Wednesday sustained one of Gov. Paul LePage’s vetoes and overturned another.

More >> As session ends, Legislature overrides LePage veto, raising legal age for tobacco to 21

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Maine DHHS eliminates funding for school-based student health centers

The program to provide basic medical care for students who would not otherwise have access to a doctor fallsl victim to the recently approved state budget, which required a $5 million annual reduction in services provided by the state Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

More >> Maine DHHS eliminates funding for school-based student health centers

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Maine lawmakers back bill to raise age to buy tobacco to 21

A bill to raise the age to buy tobacco from 18 to 21 is headed to Republican Gov. Paul LePage's desk.

The bill would take effect July 2018 and also apply to electronic smoking devices.

More >> Maine lawmakers back bill to raise age to buy tobacco to 21

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Staff shortages plague ‘dumping ground’ for Maine youth with mental illness

PORTLAND, Maine — Corrections officials say Maine’s youth prison is overburdened by children with severe mental illnesses, and this population has driven away staff who are not trained to handle them.

This strain has additionally triggered a fresh round of infighting between two of the state’s largest departments, as health and human services officials clash with their counterparts in corrections over where the blame lies and how to solve the problem.

More >> Staff shortages plague ‘dumping ground’ for Maine youth with mental illness

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Concerned groups force Maine Legislature to scrutinize DHHS child care rules

A LePage administration proposal to relax licensing requirements for in-home child care providers will receive the scrutiny of a legislative committee, after the administration indicated it would implement the new requirements without securing the Legislature’s approval.


More >> Concerned groups force Maine Legislature to scrutinize DHHS child care rules

Sunday, July 16, 2017

More Maine kids aren’t vaccinated, new data show

The number of parents opting out for philosophical or religious reasons has climbed, raising the risks of disease transmission.

More >> More Maine kids aren’t vaccinated, new data show

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Review shows deficiencies at Maine youth prison following transgender teen suicide

An outside consultant hired by the Maine Department of Corrections to review suicide prevention practices at the Long Creek Youth Development Center in South Portland has found several deficiencies in the wake of a trangender teen resident’s suicide last year.

More >> Review shows deficiencies at Maine youth prison following transgender teen suicide

Among his recommendations:

  • That the Maine DOC and/or the Maine Criminal Justice Academy develop a curriculum specific to suicide prevention in juvenile correctional facilities
  • That all direct care, security, education, medical and mental health staff should receive eight hours of initial suicide prevention training, followed by a minimum of two hours of annual training
  • That the comprehensive screening process for identification of suicide risk be improved
  • That all youth on suicide precautions be allowed to attend school and receive family visits and telephone calls unless those privileges have been suspended
If they can't take care of the kids then they should just shut it down.  

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

New lead standard in Maine means more home inspections

This is another one of those feel good programs that I've written about before.  It looks good on paper, but is really nothing more than another way for the state to invite themselves into the homes of parents while forcing them or their landlords to pump all kinds of money into abatement or risk having their homes condemned.
Maine is testing more homes for lead, following a federal recommendation aiming to stop lead exposure before children become sick. 
More >> New lead standard in Maine means more home inspections
When I dealt with these people due to elevated lead levels in my daughters blood they found nothing.
We assume she got it somewhere else but still, what a nightmare.




Friday, June 30, 2017

Recent Headlines

So the schools are apparently trying to address a truancy problem.

Some Maine school districts taking on truancy with tenacity
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Maine kids are loosing healthcare thanks to eligibility changes led by Governor LePage.


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The Maine Legislature wants to raise the smoking age to 21.

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Thursday, June 22, 2017

DHHS is paying more for child care — after saying it wasn’t allowed to

The LePage administration is relaxing certain requirements for child care providers who look after children in their own homes, while unilaterally increasing the amount of money they receive for enrolling low-income children with state-funded subsidies.

More >> DHHS is paying more for child care — after saying it wasn’t allowed to

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Misdiagnosis leads to paralysis, $1.9 million settlement for Maine girl

It was every parent’s nightmare.

In February 2014, six-year-old Wynter Przybylski was very sick. Her parents took her to a walk-in clinic in Brewer and to see the girl’s pediatrician. Both diagnosed her with severe constipation, but the treatment only made her worse.

More >> Misdiagnosis leads to paralysis, $1.9 million settlement for Maine girl

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Maine's Acting DHHS Commissioner Loves Signing Adoption Papers

So Maine's DHHS posted this little diddy on Facebook this morning about how Mary Mayhew's "acting" replacement Ricker Hamilton just LOVES signing other peoples stolen children away into new families.  A process known in the Child Protection Racket System as Adoption.


Of course the people who have never experienced the pleasures of a DHHS social worker crawling up their ass still believes that this is all for the greater good because ALL of these (18 so far) children were "abused or neglected." Maybe some of them were, but I doubt all because I know for a fact and personal experience that DHHS is unfairly heavy handed in their treatment of families who have come into contact with child welfare since Gov. Lepage and Commissioner Mayhew took over. People believe this is best without a single care in the world  as to the pain and suffering or the struggles or the work or the fighting that the families went through to get the kids to this point only to be shot down and failed by the system that was supposed to help strengthen and preserve their families by providing services to help them become better parents.

Yes I do realize that some parents are not capable of caring for their children due to whatever reason, but I also know many in Maine who are and are fighting tooth and nail to get the kids back.  It's not only them  who are getting screwed though.  Never mind, for example, the Grandparents who are capable and willing to care for the kids but are being shunned by DHHS for whatever reason.  I know grandparents in Maine who are fighting for or raising the kids and even Senator Susan Collins has taken a sudden interest in this issue.
One of the many fallouts of the opioid epidemic is that thousands of children are winding up in the care of grandparents, including many in Maine. 
With parents in prison, strung out or dead, these youngsters are among the 2.7 million nationally who count on grandparents to raise them, sometimes on limited incomes or struggling with their own health issues. 
More >> Susan Collins seeks to help grandparents raising grandchildren
Of course I'm sure Senator Collins only cares about the grandparents who were given the opportunity to care for their family members.  I haven't read it yet as I haven't found any such bill online, but I assume that there is nothign in this bill that requires DHHS to prioritize kinship placements of children rather than foster care which is what leads to adoption, just that it qualifies this segment of the population for Government Funded Services similar to what's given to foster families.

Sadly, most people who read this crap in the news or on Facebook will get that heartwarming feeling after being led to believe that the state is doing good things for the children when in all actuality it's all about the money and the services, many of which the LePage Administration has cut funding for..




Go Figure!

--------------------
FYI: You can follow the progress of Senator Collins Bill here...

S.1091 - Supporting Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Act 

Monday, June 12, 2017

Parents’ First Amendment suit seeks to allow disabled son to record school day

I agree with this lawsuit.  If the school has nothing to hide then they shouldn't worry about such things.  And Maine is a One Party State anyway.  That means that they can record and only they need to know.
The Topsham couple says the boy can barely speak so the device could provide details of his education, but the district says the practice would cause problems. 
More >> Parents’ First Amendment suit seeks to allow disabled son to record school day

Watchdogs revealed crisis in Maine’s youth prison. LePage let them go.


Image result for juvenile detention gif
You know it really scares me to see this article because I know how good the state is at taking care of kids with mental health issues.

In the child welfare system, for example, they dope them up on psych meds and tell them they're doing great while bouncing them around from home to group home to institution, all while praising in the media the foster care providers who open their hearts and homes to a child in need.   All the while the state keeps their secrets.  We rarely read about anything more than the need for more foster homes in Maine or what the state is doing to fight child abuse.

I also know how they treat kids with mental health issues in the school system.  Put the little ones into physical restraints, slide things through and blame the parents or retaliate by reporting them to DHHS for complaining.  Meanwhile, all the meetings and incidents are confidential.  In fact, the physical restraints, as horrific as they are, are referred to as therapeutic holds and when described to the parent, sugar coated all the way.

Now we're getting a glimpse of how they intend to keep us and the legislature informed of issues when they lock these kids up at the Long Creek Youth Development Center, or rather Southern Maine's Juvenile Detention Facility.  They don't.  Good care costs money, therefore they must keep their secrets in order to keep taxes low.
For more than a year, Tonya DiMillo saw tragedy waiting to happen at the state’s youth prison. 
More >> Watchdogs revealed crisis in Maine’s youth prison. LePage let them go.
After reading this article I am convinced that Governor Paul LePage just doesn't care about the most vulnerable children in our society.  He doesn't care about the lack of available services in the state that could have helped to prevent the "need" for jailing these kids, nor does he care how parents are supposed to pay for them.    

He would rather lock them up and keep it all secret.  

Friday, June 9, 2017

Augusta father ordered to take parenting class after 2-year-old nearly drowns in Kennebec River


The problem with being a parent in Maine these days is that if you are not perfect in almost every way, the state will be all over you when they are no better and often much worse for the kid than the imperfect parent.
An Augusta man pleaded guilty Tuesday to endangering the welfare of a child in connection with an incident last September in which his 2-year-old son ended up floating facedown in the Kennebec River. 
More >> Augusta father ordered to take parenting class after 2-year-old nearly drowns in Kennebec River
Although this incident COULD HAVE ended in a horrible tragedy and as parents we do have to be vigilant and on on top of things with your kid, I don't believe for a minute that this father is guilty of anything more than making a mistake.

Of course if incidents like this happened like 5 times in the family then there may be a problem.

Of course if the police reports indicated that the father was falling over drunk or overdosing on heroin at the time of the incident then there may be a problem.  But this guy is guilty of nothing more than making a mistake.  He fucked up in other words and the perfect people would want to hang him for it.  It's prone to happen at least once in every parents life.   I'm sure even the most self-righteous perfect parents among us have experienced that near death moment as a parent when your kid runs out into the middle of the street.  You turn your head for one second and your kid has taken off in a busy mall.  They won't admit it, but something can happen to them too.

Kids are fast.  Give the guy a break.


Monday, June 5, 2017

BULLIED OUT OF SCHOOL: Maine families look to cyber charter schools for success

The best way to deal with a bully is to put your kid into a karate class.  
A total of 746 incidents of bullying and harassment were reported in public schools statewide in 2016, according to the Department of Education. 
More >> BULLIED OUT OF SCHOOL: Maine families look to cyber charter schools for success

Friday, June 2, 2017

Paul LePage to decide fate of truancy measure for youngest students

A measure that would let educators extend truancy enforcement rules to 5- and 6-year-old students enrolled in public school is heading to Gov. Paul LePage’s desk, where its fate is uncertain at best.

More >> Paul LePage to decide fate of truancy measure for youngest students

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Advocates: Schools can do more to avoid physical restraint of students

Deb Davis played an integral role when the state adopted new rules governing the physical restraint of students four years ago.

Now a professional advocate for students like her own special-needs child, Davis said improvements are still needed about when and how often schools resort to using restraint, particularly when it comes to students with disabilities.

More >> Advocates: Schools can do more to avoid physical restraint of students

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Monday, May 29, 2017

The following was sent to my wifes email regarding an incident

Students are apparently parking near the homeless shelter in Portland.

May 26, 2017 

Dear Portland High School families: 
This letter is to make you aware of an incident this morning involving a Portland High School student parking her car near Oxford and Chestnut streets. The student was not hurt and police are looking into the matter, but we’d like to remind students and their families to take precautions when it comes to driving to school. 
At this time of year, many students have just acquired their driver’s licenses, so are driving to school. As a result of that, parking has become increasingly difficult. Because PHS is part of an urban campus, wherever they park, it is important for students to be aware of their surroundings and not travel alone to and from their vehicles. 
As downtown parking near the school is limited, we urge families to ask students not to drive to school unless it is absolutely necessary. We encourage students to take convenient and safe public transportation instead. METRO buses provide free transportation to all our Portland Public Schools high school students and the bus stops are located close to the school. 
If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me at either 874-8205 or at jepsos@portlandschools.org. 

Sincerely,
Sheila JepsonPrincipal, Portland High School

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Parents say Maine’s mental health system failed suicidal daughter

My heart goes out to this family.  
The parents of a Lewiston Middle School student who died by suicide this week say their daughter’s story reveals a complete breakdown in Maine’s mental health system. Anie Graham’s parents say there should be distinct protocols to help kids at risk of suicide, and properly trained providers who are available to help. 
More >> Parents say Maine’s mental health system failed suicidal daughter
I'm going to add that it isn't only the lack of available services that is the problem.  It probably isn't only the bullying that drove her to this.

Medication should never be given without therapy.  Especially since anti-depressants are linked to higher suicide rates in teenagers.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Corruption DHHS Maine / Elizabeth Hardink, LSW


1st AMENDMENT, TRUTH AND FACT, MY OPINION FROM MY EXPERIENCE.

Elizabeth Hardink, LSW checked off every box on those fake medical releases and received all mine and my children's medical records. I want them back!! Where are they?

NOTE: CORRUPT ELIZABETH HARDINK, LSW DID NOT GET HER FILTHY HANDS ON THESE AWESOME CHILDREN.

Her Slander and Defamation of this mother is pathetic. The mother doesn't even have a speeding ticket.

Per National Journal Of Medicine: When a child is removed from a loving home it is so Traumatizing it causes them "Neurological Brain Damage".  That's what Elizabeth Hardink, LSW wanted to do to these children. Neurological Brain Damage washes out as behavioral and emotional problems then DHHS abuses Psych. Drugs to control them and blames the problems on the parents.

  • Never let social workers in your home without a warrant. 
  • Post your property private property no Trespassing. If they harass you and refuse to leave you can do a Citizens Arrest on them. Record, verbally inform them 3 times to leave, then verbally inform them they are under Citizens Arrest for Trespassing, Harassment, Disturbing the Piece, and anything else you can think of. Don't touch them, simply call the Sheriff who is suppose to uphold the Constitution.
  • Teach your children reverse Miranda. 
  • Do not answer their questions. 
  • Video tape and record everything. 
  • Request the DHHS record immediately, they have 30 days to give it to you.
  • Tell them they do not have a right to open a case on your family, they are suppose to ask that. 
  • Tell them their is no danger and they don't have a right to open a case.
  • Invoke all your Constitutional, Parental, and Civil Rights. 
  • Don't allow them to speak to your children unless it is Court Ordered. 
  • Do nothing unless it's Court Ordered. 
  • In Maine you do not have to tell them you are recording. 
  • Digital Recorders are like $40 have over 100 hours recording time, and pick up everything even if in your pocket or purse. 
  • Don't take their shit. Call them out on their abuses and lies. 
  • Record Medical Appointments and Simply Store them on your computer in case you need them. 
  • Doctors will lie and lie and lie and will not dictate their abuses. 

Child Protective Services targets the poor minorities and especially single mothers.  Kids to Order Adoption Industry.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Maine’s Speaker of the House Sponsors Legislation to Reduce Child Poverty

Maine’s Speaker of the House has brought legislation forward she says will help reduce child poverty in the state.

More >> Maine’s Speaker of the House Sponsors Legislation to Reduce Child Poverty

Governor's bill targets substance abuse by pregnant women

Maine's Republican governor wants to require everyone from a school bus driver to camp counselors to report a pregnant woman's suspected substance abuse.

More >> Governor's bill targets substance abuse by pregnant women

Monday, May 8, 2017

Maine's DHHS Snatched 905 Kids Last Year



May is National Foster Care Propaganda Awareness Month and like she has over the last few years, DHHS Commissioner Mary Mayhew comes out pleading for more gullible suckers potential foster parents to warehouse a stolen kid open their hearts and their homes for a child in need.
The state says there's a continued need for foster homes in Maine as more children come into state custody because of parental substance abuse. 
More >> Maine DHHS says foster homes needed for kids with special needs
On top of that, the article goes on to say that Maine snatched 905 kids last year which is about 11 less than 2014, which I consider a significant improvement considering the leadership which has been directly responsible for an increase in state sponsored child snatching over previous years by cutting services available to families involved with the child welfare system that helped kids stay safe in the home.  
They're still blaming drug abuse as the main culprit leading to neglect but are still continuing their assaults on the poor by trying to cut Medicaid, making treatment difficult to obtain for some.  God forbid it could have anything to do with their policies.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Spurwink Will Now Be Selling Babies Apparently

So according to a letter to the editor in the Piscataquis Observer, Spurwink Services apparently got the contract for A Family For Me, which is Maine's adoption from foster care program, and they are currently recruiting more foster care providers.   And apparently there is an "urgent need," for suckers foster parents in Maine right now.  And if you want to become a foster care provider then you can call Spurwink and they'll hook you up or if you want somebody elses kid of your very own to keep forever, you can call them for that to.
Spurwink Services was awarded the A Family for ME contract by the Maine Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). This contract will allow Spurwink to relaunch A Family for ME, a statewide recruitment campaign to identify families interested in becoming foster and adoptive parents for children in custody of the Department. 
More >> Urgent need in Maine for foster care
I'm sorry but I see a conflict of interest here.  This same company also runs Maine's child abuse program which is run by Dr. Lawrence Ricci, who is arguably DHHS's favorite go to person when they need a medical diagnosis of child abuse.  This should be a real motivator for him to help DHHS get more kids into the system.  It's good for the company.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Duct Tape Sally and the Maine Child Welfare Reform Turnaround



So yesterday it came out that Sally Schofield, the former DHS (DHHS now) Child Protective Social Worker who murdered a five year old foster child named Logan Marr back in 2001 by Duct Taping her to a high chair with 42 feet of tape, has been released from the Windham Correctional Facility after serving 14 years of a 17 year sentence.
Logan Marr
Logan Marr

Now if that isn't bad enough, the news articles that are coming out are also bringing mention in little blurbs to the wonderful changes to Maine's child welfare system that the case led to under the Governor John Baldacci administration (2003 to 2011).

The case resulted in an overhaul of the state's child welfare system, putting an emphasis on keeping children with relatives rather than in foster care. 
More >> Woman convicted of killing 5-year-old foster child released

While it is true that the case led to major reforms to Maine's child welfare system,  which the state bragged about heavily in January of 2011 during the 10 year anniversary celebrations of Logan Marr's death...
Former Gov. Baldacci was among those who repaired a child protective system that was not safeguarding children. 
More >> Maine Voices: Decade of change in protecting children
they forget to point out the fact that our current governor has a totally turned it back around due to his very different philosophy regarding the protection of children from child abuse and keeping them safe in their homes.  He states this in an article back in May of 2012 in response to another high profile child abuse case.
LePage told a television station Wednesday that he supports the death penalty “for those that kill babies” and feels DHHS has “gone from one extreme to another” when it decides whether to remove a child from a home in which abuse is suspected. 
The department has been criticized in the past for being too quick to remove a child, LePage said, but now, “sometimes we’re putting them back too quickly and sometimes we’re not taking them out fast enough.” 
LePage, a victim of abuse as a child, supports a “system that protects our children,” Bennett said. 
More >> DHHS won’t release information on dead baby
The LePage Administration was able to use the above case as a springboard to launch major policy change at DHHS.

Since then, Governor LePage and Commissoner Mayhew have also worked hard to cut funding to programs that help kept kids safe in their homes under the guise of Welfare Reform as well as necessary services that helped the families to turn it around, as discussed in a 2013 opinion article from the director of one of the agencies that got cut...
The increase in foster care funding seems to suggest that the governor is looking to circumvent established practice and send children who could be successfully reunited with their families off to foster-care before attempting to reunify a family through treatment and support. Our children deserve better. Clearly the reduction in PNMI funding indicates that access to family reunification services will be much harder to come by. If this is not a shift in policy on a state level it is hard to envision otherwise. Our families deserve better. 
More >> LePage budget should provide more funding to reunify families, not keep kids in foster care
Which of course resulted in the state desperately needing to hire more foster care providers as is discussed in this article from exactly one year ago today.
Maine Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Mary Mayhew and local foster parents gathered Thursday at Adoptive and Foster Families of Maine on Main Street to encourage more families to open their homes to children in need. 
More >> State calls for more foster homes to meet growing need
Needless to say the state turned it back around.  So please don't be fooled by the blurbs.  But do feel free to discuss it with the Legislature... 

ATTENTION: PUBLIC HEARINGS ON CPS MAY 2nd 2017. We Need You All There!!
Public Hearings on Child Protective Issues
May 2nd – 1 pm in the Judiciary Room in State House Room 438
http://mainelegislature.org/committee/#Committees/JUDShould you want to testify on one, two or all three bills, you may indicate this in your testimony.
http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/getPDF.asp…LD 472 An Act Regarding Parental Rights
http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/getPDF.asp…LD 1187 An Act to Amend the Child Protective Service Statutes
http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/getPDF.asp…LD 1304 An Act to Specify the Rights of Parents

Anyway, Sally Schofield is a free women, Logan Marr is still dead, Maine's Child Welfare System is still a mess, and I still believe that if this murderer didn't work for the state, she would have gotten life. 


But they do take care of their own you know.


Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Can't stand anti-vaxxers? Head to Maine! Map reveals the Pine Tree State has the highest rates of child vaccinations

The Pine Tree State has the highest overall vaccination rates, in the country according to new data.
More >> Can't stand anti-vaxxers? Head to Maine! Map reveals the Pine Tree State has the highest rates of child vaccinations

Former Foster Mother Released from Prison After Serving 12 Year Sentence

Schofield, Sally 3-13-17





A woman convicted of manslaughter for the 2001 death of her 5-year-old foster child was released from prison today.

More >> Former Foster Mother Released from Prison After Serving 12 Year Sentence


Sally Schofield doesn't deserve to ever see the light of day again.  What they really ought to do is duct tape her to a high chair and knock it over a few times.  

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Report: Maine schools restrain, seclude students 13,000 times per year

I am not at all impressed with this.  Nor do I think this article does justice to the issue because until you see a kid in a total meltdown with two big school staff holding them down on the ground, you'll probably won't understand how bad it actually is.
A new report finds that students in Maine are restrained and secluded within their schools approximately 13,000 times per year. Educational advocates want to see reforms at the state level to bring those numbers down. 
More >> Report: Maine schools restrain, seclude students 13,000 times per year
One more thing.  They only like to do this to the little special needs kids.

The big ones will kick their asses.


Saturday, April 15, 2017

Maine should clarify when it tells parents about day care investigations, watchdog says

The report by the state's watchdog agency is part of ongoing scrutiny of the Department of Health and Human Services' licensing and inspection of child care facilities.

More >> Maine should clarify when it tells parents about day care investigations, watchdog says

Monday, April 10, 2017

Bill Would Give Parents Money for Home Schooling, Tuition

Legislators will consider a bill to give parents state money they can use for their children's education outside of the public school system.

More >> Bill Would Give Parents Money for Home Schooling, Tuition

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

LePage administration paid $315K for a consultant to rethink child care, then did nothing

Maine’s Department of Health and Human Services has paid $315,000 over the past few years to an outside consulting firm to help the state overhaul and simplify the way it handles state-funded child care assistance for lower-income, working parents.

More >> LePage administration paid $315K for a consultant to rethink child care, then did nothing

Friday, March 31, 2017

Maine DHHS is failing the children it is supposed to protect

Here's an interesting article...
Problems at Long Creek started with failures at the Department of Health and Human Services. 
More >> Maine DHHS is failing the children it is supposed to protect
I would like to point out that the kids mentioned in this article from DHHS residential homes are more likely than not foster kids being warehoused in the Youth Center.  
"And once they have served their sentences at Long Creek, children who would otherwise be released often languish inside because there are long waiting lists for community placements."
Otherwise they'd go home to their families right?

Monday, March 20, 2017

How Maine is failing working parents by leaving millions unspent on child care

As Maine faces a labor shortage that’s only expected to intensify in the coming years, the state will need to find ways to ensure more people can work. But instead of expanding access to child care and making it easier for parents to make a living, a handful of state policies that have taken effect over the past decade, during the administrations of both Govs. John Baldacci and Paul LePage, have restricted families’ ability to find affordable care for their kids.

More >> How Maine is failing working parents by leaving millions unspent on child care

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Release of woman in child’s death stirs painful memories for mother


Sally Ann Schofield, 55, a former state child caseworker who suffocated the 5-year-old foster child with duct tape, was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 17 years in prison. Schofield remains at the Maine Correctional Center in Windham and is due to be released on probation on April 25. 
More >> Release of woman in child’s death stirs painful memories for mother


You all really don't want to know what I think they should do to her.


Thursday, March 16, 2017

Parents of Fairfield woman convicted in baby’s death seek right to visit other child


It's always a tragedy when a baby dies.  This is a sad case all the way around, and I'm happy that the older child in the family is currently living with her biological father but it absolutely disgusts me that these grandparents have to fight to see an older child in the family.
Kayla Stewart, 21, appeared in court Monday on a writ from the Maine Correctional Center for a petition for grandparents' rights filed by Lucille and Randall Stewart, her adoptive parents. 
More >> Parents of Fairfield woman convicted in baby’s death seek right to visit other child
The father has no reason to cut them off.  They didn't kill the baby and shouldn't be punished any more than they already have been.


Saturday, March 11, 2017

Former DHHS worker convicted in death of 5-year-old to be released


A former DHHS caseworker convicted in the death of a 5-year-old girl will soon be released from prison. 
Sally Ann Schofield was convicted in 2002 and is serving a 20 year sentence for killing Logan Marr. 
More >> Former DHHS worker convicted in death of 5-year-old to be released

A real parent would have gotten life and this murderer will soon be able to get on with hers..

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Maine's DHHS has a Serious Rat Problem but doesn't want to call it that


In a surprisingly in depth article from the Bangor Daily News, it has come out that Maine's Child Abuse Hotline apparently isn't equip to handle the volume of calls coming in these days.
The state’s child abuse hotline wasn’t able to answer about 1,000 calls per month on average last year, increasing the possibility of injuries to children that otherwise could have been prevented. 
More >> 1,000 calls per month to Maine’s child abuse hotline went unanswered last year
Oh my God!  This is horrible!  Imagine all of those poor abused and neglected children going without the help that they may so desperately need.

Now usually I would point to something like this as a more typical DHHS incompetence or collateral damage from LePage era budget cuts, but this one is more concerning because in addition to another DHHS failure, it points out that Maine has around 55,000 people rushing out to make that call every year.

For the sake of argument, some would suggest that a high number of calls to the child abuse hotline would be a good thing because it means that concerned citizens are looking out for all of the poor abused and neglected children right?   I would even agree with that if not for the fact that most of these people don't know the difference between child abuse and a hole in the ground.

Lets take a closer look at my point.  According to the BDN Article mentioned above...
In 2015, 33 percent of calls — 17,907 out of 54,179 — weren’t answered on the first try. And in 2014, 32 percent of callers — 17,514 out of 55,041 — either hung up or went to voicemail.
However according to an Office of Child and Family Services report, in 2014 Maine only had 2392 substantiated cases of child abuse or neglect, while in 2015 there were only 2148.

To clarify:

In the year 2014:  There were 55,041 calls to the child abuse hotline in Maine that resulted in 2392 confirmed cases of child maltreatment.

In the year 2015:  There were 54,179 calls to the child abuse hotline in Maine that resulted in 2148 confirmed cases of child maltreatment.  

(Page 10)

What this all means folks is that if the state is reporting accurate numbers, then when you apply the math only about 4% of calls to the child abuse hotline in Maine result in confirmed cases of child abuse or neglect.  IOW, out of 54,179 calls to DHHS in 2015, about 52,031 didn't result in squat.  Therefore there are about 52,000 concerned citizens in Maine who apparently deserve to be smacked upside the head every year.

So as you can see the problem isn't so much with an overburdened child abuse hotline as it is with the number of idiots who are overburdening it, because they decide to make that call without having a clue in regards to what constitutes child abuse or neglect or the balls to follow through with the report.  Because of that, there are probably little children in Maine who really are abused and neglected who are falling through the cracks because DHHS is too busy sorting through all the crap from all of the false accusing idiot CPS Rats on a moral superiority trip.

And that my friends is the real problem.


Monday, February 20, 2017

Bill Would Provide Mainers With Free Day Care and Home Health Services

Progressive lawmakers and caregiving advocates launched a campaign Monday to establish a Universal Family Care System in Maine. If approved by the Legislature, the system would provide childcare and home care services for all children, seniors and individuals with disabilities, regardless of income.

More >> Bill Would Provide Mainers With Free Day Care and Home Health Services



Saturday, February 18, 2017

Maine's DHHS is ignoring their own failures



Why must I keep saying this?

As of this morning, pretty much every News Media Outlet in Maine is carrying the heartbreaking story which claims that DHHS is snatching more children due to "Parental Drug Abuse."
Here's the story from WMTW News 8 >> Drug abuse sending more kids to state custody 
Here it is from WPOR >>  Drug Abuse Sending More Kids to State Custody
We can't leave out the Propaganda Press Herald's version either >>  Parents’ drug abuse blamed as more Maine children removed from homes
They're posting the story as if it's a sudden realization.  It's like, "Oh my God, how did this happen?  This is horrible!  What are we going to do?"

Of course, Maine isn't the only state struggling with this issue.  In fact, it's a major epidemic all across the country.  
The nation’s drug-addiction epidemic is driving a dramatic increase in the number of children entering foster care, forcing many states to take urgent steps to care for neglected children.
More >> Drug-Addiction Epidemic Creates Crisis in Foster Care
What really amazes me that this REOCCURRING TALE keeps coming up as a newly presented major story in Maine, every so often since about 2012.  For example, here's a Bangor Daily News article from October of 2012 when Bath Salts were all the rage.  >> Parents’ bath salts abuse sends more children to state custody

They couldn't believe it then either.  It was like, "Oh my God!  How did this happen?"

Of course DHHS knows full well what's going on and has for a long time.
If the demand for and cost of foster care in Maine spiked this fiscal year because of drug abuse among young parents, it’s doubtful that child welfare workers were surprised by it. 
Experts in the field say the impact of parental drug use has been visible and mounting for years. 
From an article in the Portland Press Herald from March of 2013 >> Poor planning adds to Maine’s foster care crisis
And this is where I have to stop and get real, because only two years before the above mentioned article came out, Maine was bragging about their National Model Child Welfare System, and how they were "leaders at keeping kids safe in the home."  

The success that DHHS was able to celebrate as late as January of 2011, was significant, including drastically cutting the number of children being removed from their homes in the first place and when they did have to be removed, relying more on kinship placements such as a grandparent or an aunt or even the biological father when they were able.  In doing so, they cut the number of kids in foster care in half over decade beginning with a wave of attention brought to Maine's Child Welfare system after the death of a five year old foster child named Logan Marr who was murdered in January of 2001.
So they know what works. They know how to improve their numbers.  They know how to get the kids back home and they know how to work with the families that have drug dependency issues so that many of these kids can go home.

Here is a part of a letter from Dean Crocker, Maine's Children's Ombudsman to the National Coalition for Child Welfare Reform...
As you have noted, it is in the best interest of a child to keep him/her in the home and with the family whenever possible and safe to do so. Caseworkers now emphasize this goal as they work closely with families, ensuring they receive the supports and services necessary to keep the child safe and the family intact. Reducing the rate of children who are placed in state care or custody has been a significant achievement of our program. In December 2004, there were 2,590 Maine children in DHHS state care or custody. In December 2009, the number in care or custody dropped to 1,650. During this time period, Maine saw a 38.3 percent decrease in the rate of children in DHHS care or custody.
 http://www.nccprblog.org/2011/01/guest-blog-foster-care-in-maine-more-on.html
Notice what it says?  "work closely with families, ensuring they receive the supports and services necessary to keep the child safe and the family intact."  And how do they do this?  Here's one example...
Why does Maine need Family Treatment Drug Courts (FTDC)? 
Research has demonstrated that a very high proportion of child protective cases involve parental substance abuse.  Family Treatment Drug Courts have demonstrated improved retention by parents in substance abuse and other treatment, reduced time in foster care, and expedited permanency plans for children. 
Maine's Family Treatment Drug Courts
So the solution is to expand successful programs like this that help people to get off of drugs so that 
a. they're not taking so many kids to begin with and...
b. the kids that they are taking can go home that much quicker...
Which will, of course, lower the number of kids in foster care in Maine instead of increasing the number of kids in foster care which is now the case.

So how did we come to this?  From a National Model Child Welfare System in January of 2011 to "Drug abuse sending more kids to state custody" only 6 years later when we know how successful, not to mention cost effective so many of these programs actually are as compared to the thousands it costs to keep a kid in foster care for however long?  
Local mom first graduate of Family Treatment Drug Court in Bangor
Unfortunately we got a governor with a totally different philosophy on the issue of Child Abuse and Neglect who used one horrific and high profile child abuse case to launch a major policy change in Maine's Child Welfare System.
LePage told a television station Wednesday that he supports the death penalty “for those that kill babies” and feels DHHS has “gone from one extreme to another” when it decides whether to remove a child from a home in which abuse is suspected. 
The department has been criticized in the past for being too quick to remove a child, LePage said, but now, “sometimes we’re putting them back too quickly and sometimes we’re not taking them out fast enough." 
LePage, a victim of abuse as a child, supports a “system that protects our children,” Bennett said.  
DHHS won’t release information on dead baby
That mixed with his welfare cuts have created a state with a big problem and few adequate solutions.
This is pathetic.  Simply pathetic.



Drug Abuse Sending More Kids to State Custody

The state wants your kids.
The state of Maine has removed an increasing number of children from their homes in recent years because of their parent’s drug abuse. 
More >> Drug Abuse Sending More Kids to State Custody
Never mind the fact that Governor LePage has cut the shit out of drug abuse programs.

Never mind the fact that there are very successful drug intervention programs that help to keep families together often at a much lower cost than throwing the kid into foster care.




Friday, February 17, 2017

Education reform panel issues first report

A 15-member commission on education reform issued its first report last week, calling for exploring statewide or regional contracts to better compensate and retain effective teachers.

More >> Education reform panel issues first report

Corporal punishment has no place in our schools

Apparently, it’s still legal for Maine public schools to use corporal punishment on children, and there seems to be a lot of confusion about this. Many people, including myself, thought corporal punishment was no longer legal in Maine. I actually thought it must be illegal everywhere. I was wrong!

More >> Corporal punishment has no place in our schools

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Parent suing Maranacook district picked for school board

A parent suing the Maranacook schools over an allegation that a teacher placed a bag over his daughter’s head to humiliate her is now one of Readfield’s representatives on the regional school board.

More >> Parent suing Maranacook district picked for school board

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Monday, February 13, 2017

Maine Voices: LePage’s proposed cuts cast school leaders as fat to be trimmed

As districts statewide begin to deliberate on school budgets, the Joint Standing Committee on Appropriations is poised to hear testimony regarding the governor’s biennial budget. Given the many cuts to public education proposed by Gov. LePage, I urge fellow Maine citizens to speak up to protect our schools.

More >> Maine Voices: LePage’s proposed cuts cast school leaders as fat to be trimmed

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Sanford police seek woman suspected of taking her children illegally

Belmore is accused of “criminal restraint by a parent,” which under Maine statute is defined as the parent of a child illegally taking custody of the child from the child’s other parent, guardian or lawful custodian.

More >> Sanford police seek woman suspected of taking her children illegally

Friday, February 10, 2017

Investigation of Lewiston Schools Uncovers Alleged Discrimination by Race, Disability

A two-year investigation of the Lewiston School Department by Disability Rights Maine, Pine Tree Legal Assistance and the ACLU of Maine has uncovered what the groups say are violations of federal civil rights and disabilities laws.

More >> Investigation of Lewiston Schools Uncovers Alleged Discrimination by Race, Disability

LePage expects to get tough on 'deadbeat dads'

I still am not seeing much about this.
Gov. Paul LePage spoke about bills addressing child support and home foreclosures during his State of the State address on Tuesday. 
The governor said it's time to take aim at "deadbeat dads" and called it "unethical" for elderly people to be kicked out of their homes. 
More >> LePage expects to get tough on 'deadbeat dads'
So all we get is a little blurb without details.  However, I'm sure it comes from the mentality that blames estranged fathers for the high welfare rates.  Perhaps it's all huff and puff.  I don't know.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

How to file a complaint against the Professional Medical License of Dr. Lawrence Ricci


Due to ongoing abuse of children and parents by Dr. Lawrence Ricci, the Cash Cow and Medical Director for Spurwink's Child Abuse Program, it is important for families to start standing up for themselves.  A fairly easy way to thank him for all the troubles he has caused your family would be to file a complaint against his License to Practice Medicine in the state with the Maine Board of Licensure in Medicine.

----------------------
Filing a complaint in against the professional license of any health care professional in Maine is easy.  

If you have online access, you could go to their website and learn about professional licensing.  

They have an online complaint form that you can fill out.  

You could also download and print out a PDF complaint form (be sure to send it certified mail) 

Or you could call (207) 287-3601 and request a paper copy of the complaint form and they will send you one in the mail.  

The quickest way would be to do so online and the state provides consumer advocates who will help you through the process once you submit your initial complaint.
-------------------  

Once your complaint is filed, it will be considered by the licensing board.  Dr. Ricci will then be given a chance to respond to the complaint after which you will be given the chance to rebut his response and provide your evidence of his unethical and traumatizing behavior.  

The more people who do this the better.  Imagine him having to respond to 50 complaints all at once. The poor bastard will be feeling like a real parent in a child abuse investigation.  

The important thing is to tell the truth.  Don't try to make anything up.  From what I've been hearing from parents, there is no need to anyway.  Nor can Dr. Ricci do anything to retaliate against you.  

If it is determined that he has abused his position, they will suspend his license so he will no longer be able to do this to families.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

State closes transgender death investigation

Maine's attorney general says no further investigation is needed into the suicide of a transgender boy at Long Creek Youth Development Center last fall.

More >> State closes transgender death investigation

Maine Education Association Says It Will Push Back Against Betsy DeVos

The Maine Education Association is vowing to push back against newly confirmed U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, concerned that DeVos will weaken public schools.

MEA president Lois Kilby-Chesley says the confirmation of Betsy DeVos poses a direct threat to public schools because the new education secretary favors charter schools.

More >> Maine Education Association Says It Will Push Back Against Betsy DeVos