Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Increasing Minimum Wage Has Lifted 10,000 Kids From Poverty, Maine Study Finds

Debates around minimum wage continue to dominate politics, as local movements branch into powerful national pushes for better wages and working conditions. It's an important discussion for adults to have, but where do kids weigh in? A new Maine study recently found that increasing minimum wage has lifted 10,000 kids from poverty.

Minimum wage is complicated to discuss, because it has both state and federal standards. As of 2018, the federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, which the Department of Labor noted as going into effect on July 24, 2009. When it comes to states, though, minimum wage can vary greatly.

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Tuesday, September 25, 2018

We're Number 1 : Maine has highest percentage of children living in low-income young families



The "Kids Count" report from the Casey Foundation finds 85 percent of Maine children with young parents live in low-income families. It's the highest percentage compared to other states.

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Saturday, September 22, 2018

Maine schools step up efforts to prevent sexual abuse of young children

Elementary schools throughout the state will spend the 2018-19 academic year implementing a new policy to improve their ability to prevent and respond to child sexual abuse.


Prompted by a 2015 law that required a new model to be implemented by July 1, 2016, the Department of Education and the Maine Coalition Against Sexual Assault ( MECASA) have created a model policy for school administrators to adopt this year. The policy also provides pre-kindergarten through grade 5 students with age-appropriate child sexual abuse prevention education.

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Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Feds: Medication plans for foster children lacking

Nearly 30 percent of foster children in Maine who were prescribed powerful psychiatric drugs did not receive a basic “treatment plan” or regular reviews of their medications, a federal investigation has found.

Just shy of one-third of children in foster care in Maine during the period reviewed by federal investigators were prescribed anti-depressants, drugs to treat anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders or other “psychotropic” medications. The proportion of Maine foster children receiving such drugs — 1,155 of the 3,527 children in foster care, or 32.7 percent — was well above the 22.2 percent national average for the analyzed period, ranking Maine fifth behind North Dakota, Virginia, New Hampshire and Iowa.

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Saturday, September 15, 2018

DHHS to review failures of Maine’s mental health treatment for kids

The LePage administration has hired a private consulting firm to lead a wholesale review of how the state provides mental health services to children and where the state’s services are falling short.

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Friday, September 14, 2018

The Latest: Maine lawmakers pass teacher misconduct bill

Maine schools would have to alert the state about investigations into teacher misconduct under a bill headed to the governor's desk.

The Senate and House unanimously approved the bill Thursday.

Republican Gov. Paul LePage submitted the bill, which aims to address the issue of Maine educators who are accused of misconduct, and who then resign while maintaining their teaching credential.

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Saturday, September 8, 2018

It's A New School Year, And Maine Schools Are Taking New Safety Measures

It's A New School Year, And Maine Schools Are Taking New Safety Measures
In the wake of the fatal school shooting in Parkland, Florida earlier this year, schools across Maine are taking steps to respond and increasing security measures.

Some are adding security cameras, some are stocking tourniquets, and several have hired new school resource officers to patrol the hallways. While supporters of these new positions say they help make the community feel more secure, civil liberties advocates say the increased police presence could bring its own negative consequences.

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