Saturday, March 30, 2019

Lawmakers discuss bill aimed at bringing children back to Maine who have been sent to other states for mental health and behavioral services

A public hearing was held on a bill Friday aimed at bringing over 50 Maine kids with mental health and behavioral problems back to our state.

We're told these kids have been shipped out of state for services because Maine doesn't have adequate staffing to serve them.

More >> Lawmakers discuss bill aimed at bringing children back to Maine who have been sent to other states for mental health and behavioral services

Friday, March 29, 2019

Report says more Maine kids were in state custody, waiting to be adopted, in 2018

The number of children in state custody increased by 17 percent and the number of children in foster care rose by 20 percent from 2017 to 2018, according to a new report.

Additionally, Maine led the nation in 2017 for the highest rate of children diagnosed with anxiety disorders and was third for the rate of children diagnosed with depression.

More >> Report says more Maine kids were in state custody, waiting to be adopted, in 2018

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Lawmakers advocate for improvements to Maine’s lead testing program

Bills that aim to improve testing for lead in children went before the Legislature’s Health and Human Services Committee on Tuesday and most people who testified at the public hearing spoke in favor of the measures.

Maine is the only New England state that does not require a universal blood test for lead in all infants, but bills by Rep. Victoria Morales, D-South Portland, and Sen. Nate Libby, D-Lewiston, would make testing mandatory for 1- and 2-year-olds across the state. Morales’ bill would go a step further, and also test 6-year-olds. Currently, testing is only required for 1- and 2-year-olds in the Medicaid program. Children who have private insurance are not part of that mandate, although many pediatricians routinely test children regardless of whether they have Medicaid or private insurance. Doctors are currently required to ask all parents whether their children are at risk of being exposed to lead by asking about the age of their residence and other questions. But according to Tuesday’s testimony, it’s not clear how many pediatricians are doing the assessments.

More >> Lawmakers advocate for improvements to Maine’s lead testing program

Saturday, March 23, 2019

Maine gets an “F” for efforts to address lead in school drinking water

Reacting to pervasive lead contamination in schools’ drinking water, Environment Maine Research & Policy Center gave Maine an F grade today for addressing the problem, according to a new national report. In the second edition of Environment Maine Research & Policy Center’s Get The Lead Out study, the state showed poor progress as Maine received an “F” grade in 2017, as well. We are calling for swift action to ensure lead-free water in Maine’s schools.

“Schools should be safe places for our kids to learn and play, but Maine is still failing to protect our kids from lead in drinking water,” said Carissa Maurin, State Director with Environment Maine Research & Policy Center. “We need policies that actually get the lead out of faucets and fountains in our schools and pre-schools.”

More >> Maine gets an “F” for efforts to address lead in school drinking water

Monday, March 18, 2019

Maine woman arrested in Beverly, charged with kidnapping 2 children

A 28-year-old woman wanted for kidnapping her two children from Maine was arrested in a home here after a "Be On the Lookout" alert was issued.

Brittany Bohan, 28, was apprehended Monday by Massachusetts State Police. She was charged with being a fugitive from justice and on a court warrant and will be arraigned Tuesday in Salem District Court, police said.

More >> Maine woman arrested in Beverly, charged with kidnapping 2 children

Friday, March 15, 2019

Mother of Ayla Reynolds asks court for more time to find girl’s father



The mother of missing Maine toddler Ayla Reynolds is asking for more time to find the little girl’s father.

An attorney for Trista Reynolds told CBS 13 a request was filed in court for an additional 60 days to find Justin DiPietro.

More >> Mother of Ayla Reynolds asks court for more time to find girl’s father

Saturday, March 9, 2019

DHHS Commissioner Outlines Plan To Improve Child Protective Services

State officials told members of the legislature's Government Oversight Committee Friday that improvements to the child protective system are underway. The panel held a public hearing on the latest report following the abuse deaths of two girls last winter, which details a number of concerns raised by caseworkers. Some lawmakers and citizens say they want more to be done, and soon.

According to the report, the top concerns reported include large caseloads and a shortage of foster placements, which means caseworkers often spend hours or days with children in hotels and emergency rooms. Child protective workers are also frustrated that changes in protective services were made without their input in the wake of the deaths of two girls.

More >> DHHS Commissioner Outlines Plan To Improve Child Protective Services

FYI: They are all clueless.  What they need to do is to provide the services that help to keep kids safe in the home so they don't have the foster care system flooded with frivolous cases. 


Friday, March 1, 2019

Political advocacy in classroom ban, cursive bill, both fail

Two bills have failed in committee that would have made changes to Maine schools. One would have banned teachers from engaged in political or ideological advocacy in the classroom. The other would have required students in elementary school learn cursive.

More >> Political advocacy in classroom ban, cursive bill, both fail